Fighting “The Death of Words”

As a college writing instructor, I have noticed a disturbing trend in my students’ ability to choose and use words appropriately.  These same students also appear increasingly unable to comprehend critical vocabulary used in non-fiction writing. The unfortunate result of these challenges is an inability to contribute to class discussions on important ideas and the inevitable struggle with articulating a coherent response in writing. Students … Continue reading Fighting “The Death of Words”

“Mere Christian Education”?: the Challenges and Possibilities of Ecumenism in Classical Christian Education

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks “But there is one good point which both these churches have in common — they are both party churches. I think I warned you before that if your patient can’t be kept out of the Church, he ought at least to be violently attached to some party within it. I don’t mean on really doctrinal … Continue reading “Mere Christian Education”?: the Challenges and Possibilities of Ecumenism in Classical Christian Education

Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood Book Review

By Christine Norvell “I fancy I have never written a book in which I did not quote from him. But it has not seemed to me that those who have received my books kindly take even now sufficient notice of the affiliation. Honesty drives me to emphasize it.”—C.S. Lewis I can’t explain it as well as I’d like, but there’s something to George MacDonald’s preachy … Continue reading Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood Book Review

Going Back to High School

Last week I celebrated two years since my PhD graduation. It’s hard to believe that after pre-K through doctorate, with only two short breaks (one year between college and masters, and six months between masters and PhD) in between, I am forever done with my formal education. In fact, it has now been over four years since my last PhD seminar. I thought about this … Continue reading Going Back to High School

Stop Loving People, Part 6

This article is the sixth installment of a series entitled Stop Loving People by Josh Dyson. Part 6 continues from the last article posted here. Solution #5: Adopt an Apocalyptic view of your people (persons) Now before your mind starts racing ahead to envisioning your “naughty students” and “heathen coworkers” being trampled upon under the hooves of the Four Horsemen, consider what James K. A. Smith … Continue reading Stop Loving People, Part 6

Stop Loving People, Part 5

This article is the fifth installment of a series entitled Stop Loving People by Josh Dyson. Part 5 continues from the last article posted here. Solution #2: Word and Sacrament Hebrews 10.24-25 says, “And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more … Continue reading Stop Loving People, Part 5

On the Shoulders of Hobbits (Book Blurbs)

Louis Markos is an excellent writer (perhaps an even better speaker if you get the chance to hear him) and has fantastic insight into both Tolkien and Lewis. The structure of the book is easy to follow and is centered around the four cardinal and three theological virtues. For each virtue, Markos demonstrates with examples from Tolkien and Lewis’s stories how each writer develops these … Continue reading On the Shoulders of Hobbits (Book Blurbs)

The Abolition of Education: A Warning from C.S. Lewis

By Steve Turley, Tall Oaks Classical School and Eastern University TurleyTalks.com There is no doubt that the 1940s constituted a most historically formidable decade: the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, WWII, the advent of the Atomic bomb, the transformation of the U.S. into a global super power, the establishment of NATO, and the founding of the People’s Republic of China. Yet among these notable events … Continue reading The Abolition of Education: A Warning from C.S. Lewis

Monday Musings (October 16, 2017): Start Searching Today

This year I have begun occasionally giving my students writing prompts before class begins and allowing the first 5-6 minutes of class to be a time of reflection. I have found that in the midst of busy lives, loads of work, and everything else with which the teenage mind is occupied, it is absolutely necessary to remind them frequently why we do what we do. … Continue reading Monday Musings (October 16, 2017): Start Searching Today