My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

Thank God I still read because I want to read.  I’m sure it’s the best kind of pressure—the pressure to read, that is.  But if ‘positive’ peer pressure had its way, I fear I would drown in leadership books about how to accomplish more by doing less (or some such).  My own ideas for books on leadership 14 school-years later are closer to:  Launching a … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

Halfway: Moments That Sadden and Gladden

By Christine Norvell This time of year seems to both sadden me and lighten my heart. In the school year, I grow sad because I realize that my time of influence with my students is even shorter. Only months remain, not an entire school year. Yet I’m grateful for a two-week reprieve. Not seeing each other for a time does help us appreciate each other … Continue reading Halfway: Moments That Sadden and Gladden

“What’s a Casket?”

Guest Author, Jenny Solomon “What’s a casket?” Those four words clatter onto the dinner table like a dropped fork. You are a young boy asking a simple question. I pause to look you over—noticing the mouth those words come from. It’s a mixed-up assembly of full grown and babies. One of your loose teeth dangles, hanging on by a thread. The next bite of the … Continue reading “What’s a Casket?”

The Case for Classical P.E.

The Case for Classical PE Jenny Crockett A more classical PE? Can we really apply the classical model that we use in the classroom to physical education?  Absolutely!  Children today need the “lost tools” of a physical education more than ever. Physical literacy, understanding how and why the human body works and how it was created to move, is a vital skill that has been … Continue reading The Case for Classical P.E.

Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom

The following is one of the sessions from our 2019 Conference co-hosted by School of the Ozarks and held at the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO.   Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom Classical education has taught us the importance of reading quality literature from real texts. But, what other components should a successful reading program include? Mary Kay hopes … Continue reading Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom

Teaching Poetry

By Christine Norvell   Poetry is boned with ideas, nerved and blooded with emotions, all held together by the delicate, tough skin of words.  —Paul EnglePaul  The more we read poetry, the more we appreciate what we read. Whether we read poetry for ourselves or teach it in any grade or subject, reading, appreciating, and understanding it is a skill that grows with experience. Over the … Continue reading Teaching Poetry

Pachomius

By Nathan Carr With an unobstructed view to Joy, let us go back to the first school tradition of the Christian Church—the monastery.  How did the first attempt at formal Christian education enlist its students into the great “story being told?”  Among the monastic schoolmasters of the 4th century—abbots and abbesses—one in particular gives profound insight into the formation of several abbeys throughout Egypt:  St. … Continue reading Pachomius