It Sounds Like Singing

By Kelly Garrison, Guest Author It sounds like singing! As a description of sound, singing most often refers to the human voice. Birds chirp and machines whine, but people sing. In terms of creation, people are sacredly set apart and created to know, understand, and seek. For the Children’s Sake reminds us that Charlotte Mason specified children as persons, and in her teachings she respected … Continue reading It Sounds Like Singing

Science, Natural History, or Natural Philosophy: What Exactly Are We Calling It These Days?

By Dr. Brian Polk, Guest Author I recently asked a group of science educators that work for Christian Classical Schools if they prefer the term science or natural philosophy, and I’d like to pause to ask you the same. I prefer Natural Philosophy for a few reasons, and some explication is warranted. However, most of it has to do with the meaning, literal and implied, … Continue reading Science, Natural History, or Natural Philosophy: What Exactly Are We Calling It These Days?

The Case for Classical P.E.: A Practical Application for Upper School

By Jenny Crockett, Guest Author “Pupils develop a well-disciplined attitude toward the ‘hard work principle’ in terms of heavy, energy-output type of activities.” This is a quote from Stan LeProtti’s program guide for the La Sierra High School PE program. He expected his students to do hard things. He took a whole man approach to physical education to produce students who were both physically and physiologically fit, … Continue reading The Case for Classical P.E.: A Practical Application for Upper School

Letter to a First Year Teacher

By Dr. Brad Dolloff, Guest Author As head of a classical Christian school, I could not be more thrilled my oldest child has started a career as a classical Christian school teacher. He graduated from School of the Ozarks, the school I helped found on the campus of College of the Ozarks, went on to study at John Brown University (where he studied under Jessica … Continue reading Letter to a First Year Teacher

What Are You Looking For? The Crossroads of Classical Education and College

By Wade Ortego, Guest Author Whether it is the numerous startups launching, charter schools clamoring to copy the model with state approval, or mainstream Christian schools seeking to boost enrollment with transitions to the classical curriculum, the classical model is on the rise. After the past two years of lockdowns, online learning, and teacher strikes, families seek something new for their child’s education. While many … Continue reading What Are You Looking For? The Crossroads of Classical Education and College

Teaching as Hospitality 

By Carrie Eben, Guest Author Hospitality might not be the first word for many to describe a posture of teaching. My first understanding of the word hospitality was limited to the act of entertaining guests, and if this is one’s only understanding of the word then a negative response is warranted—the role of the teacher is not to entertain her students. However, this is not … Continue reading Teaching as Hospitality 

You Should Teach Poetry: Science Demonstrates It

By Albert Cheng, Guest Author Albert Cheng is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Education Reform in the College of Education and Health Professions at the University of Arkansas, where he teaches courses in education policy and philosophy. He is the director of the Classical Education Research Lab, where he conducts research on the effects of classical education on character formation. He is a Senior Fellow at … Continue reading You Should Teach Poetry: Science Demonstrates It

Competent Christianity

By Lindsey Scholl, Trinity Classical School One day, author Dorothy L. Sayers received a letter from an admirer of her play, The Zeal of Thy House. Like almost all of her plays, this production had depicted supernatural creatures on stage: four archangels, each eleven-feet high and draped in gorgeous gold robes. The admirer asked if Sayers had selected the angel-actors “for the excellence of their … Continue reading Competent Christianity

Joyful Music Literacy & the Classical Christian School Music Teacher

By Jarrod Richey There is a saying, “those who can, do, and those who can’t, teach.” The music educator might be tempted to think that he/she is missing out on the “real” work of music. But we know in the classical movement that education is more about formation than simply imparting information.[1] The honorable place of power and influence is in teaching and mentoring students. … Continue reading Joyful Music Literacy & the Classical Christian School Music Teacher

Teaching, Oblivion, and the Mortification of the Self

By Ian August Mosley, Latin Teacher at School of the Ozarks Most movies are not about teachers. They are not as popular a subject as criminals, warriors, or lovers. Nor do movies about teachers include many scenes of actual teaching. Films cover teaching itself with a demure veil that calls to mind the strict propriety of the golden age of Hollywood. In the old movies, … Continue reading Teaching, Oblivion, and the Mortification of the Self

Relational Communication: A Battle Between Time and Cultivation

By Kevin Thames You are standing in the hallway, outside your classroom door, saying goodbye to your students as the school day has come to a close. Your students are on their way to their lockers as parents are entering the school to pick up their children. You happen to see one of your students’ parents. You throw out a, “How are you doing this … Continue reading Relational Communication: A Battle Between Time and Cultivation

My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

Thank God I still read because I want to read.  I’m sure it’s the best kind of pressure—the pressure to read, that is.  But if ‘positive’ peer pressure had its way, I fear I would drown in leadership books about how to accomplish more by doing less (or some such).  My own ideas for books on leadership 14 school-years later are closer to:  Launching a … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)