Competent Christianity

By Lindsey Scholl, Trinity Classical School One day, author Dorothy L. Sayers received a letter from an admirer of her play, The Zeal of Thy House. Like almost all of her plays, this production had depicted supernatural creatures on stage: four archangels, each eleven-feet high and draped in gorgeous gold robes. The admirer asked if Sayers had selected the angel-actors “for the excellence of their … Continue reading Competent Christianity

Joyful Music Literacy & the Classical Christian School Music Teacher

By Jarrod Richey There is a saying, “those who can, do, and those who can’t, teach.” The music educator might be tempted to think that he/she is missing out on the “real” work of music. But we know in the classical movement that education is more about formation than simply imparting information.[1] The honorable place of power and influence is in teaching and mentoring students. … Continue reading Joyful Music Literacy & the Classical Christian School Music Teacher

Teaching, Oblivion, and the Mortification of the Self

By Ian August Mosley, Latin Teacher at School of the Ozarks Most movies are not about teachers. They are not as popular a subject as criminals, warriors, or lovers. Nor do movies about teachers include many scenes of actual teaching. Films cover teaching itself with a demure veil that calls to mind the strict propriety of the golden age of Hollywood. In the old movies, … Continue reading Teaching, Oblivion, and the Mortification of the Self

Relational Communication: A Battle Between Time and Cultivation

By Kevin Thames You are standing in the hallway, outside your classroom door, saying goodbye to your students as the school day has come to a close. Your students are on their way to their lockers as parents are entering the school to pick up their children. You happen to see one of your students’ parents. You throw out a, “How are you doing this … Continue reading Relational Communication: A Battle Between Time and Cultivation

My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

Thank God I still read because I want to read.  I’m sure it’s the best kind of pressure—the pressure to read, that is.  But if ‘positive’ peer pressure had its way, I fear I would drown in leadership books about how to accomplish more by doing less (or some such).  My own ideas for books on leadership 14 school-years later are closer to:  Launching a … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

“What’s a Casket?”

Guest Author, Jenny Solomon “What’s a casket?” Those four words clatter onto the dinner table like a dropped fork. You are a young boy asking a simple question. I pause to look you over—noticing the mouth those words come from. It’s a mixed-up assembly of full grown and babies. One of your loose teeth dangles, hanging on by a thread. The next bite of the … Continue reading “What’s a Casket?”

The Case for Classical P.E.

The Case for Classical PE Jenny Crockett A more classical PE? Can we really apply the classical model that we use in the classroom to physical education?  Absolutely!  Children today need the “lost tools” of a physical education more than ever. Physical literacy, understanding how and why the human body works and how it was created to move, is a vital skill that has been … Continue reading The Case for Classical P.E.