Joyful Music Literacy & the Classical Christian School Music Teacher

By Jarrod Richey There is a saying, “those who can, do, and those who can’t, teach.” The music educator might be tempted to think that he/she is missing out on the “real” work of music. But we know in the classical movement that education is more about formation than simply imparting information.[1] The honorable place of power and influence is in teaching and mentoring students. … Continue reading Joyful Music Literacy & the Classical Christian School Music Teacher

Teaching, Oblivion, and the Mortification of the Self

By Ian August Mosley, Latin Teacher at School of the Ozarks Most movies are not about teachers. They are not as popular a subject as criminals, warriors, or lovers. Nor do movies about teachers include many scenes of actual teaching. Films cover teaching itself with a demure veil that calls to mind the strict propriety of the golden age of Hollywood. In the old movies, … Continue reading Teaching, Oblivion, and the Mortification of the Self

Relational Communication: A Battle Between Time and Cultivation

By Kevin Thames You are standing in the hallway, outside your classroom door, saying goodbye to your students as the school day has come to a close. Your students are on their way to their lockers as parents are entering the school to pick up their children. You happen to see one of your students’ parents. You throw out a, “How are you doing this … Continue reading Relational Communication: A Battle Between Time and Cultivation

My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

Thank God I still read because I want to read.  I’m sure it’s the best kind of pressure—the pressure to read, that is.  But if ‘positive’ peer pressure had its way, I fear I would drown in leadership books about how to accomplish more by doing less (or some such).  My own ideas for books on leadership 14 school-years later are closer to:  Launching a … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

“What’s a Casket?”

Guest Author, Jenny Solomon “What’s a casket?” Those four words clatter onto the dinner table like a dropped fork. You are a young boy asking a simple question. I pause to look you over—noticing the mouth those words come from. It’s a mixed-up assembly of full grown and babies. One of your loose teeth dangles, hanging on by a thread. The next bite of the … Continue reading “What’s a Casket?”

Teaching Poetry

By Christine Norvell   Poetry is boned with ideas, nerved and blooded with emotions, all held together by the delicate, tough skin of words.  —Paul EnglePaul  The more we read poetry, the more we appreciate what we read. Whether we read poetry for ourselves or teach it in any grade or subject, reading, appreciating, and understanding it is a skill that grows with experience. Over the … Continue reading Teaching Poetry

Pachomius

By Nathan Carr With an unobstructed view to Joy, let us go back to the first school tradition of the Christian Church—the monastery.  How did the first attempt at formal Christian education enlist its students into the great “story being told?”  Among the monastic schoolmasters of the 4th century—abbots and abbesses—one in particular gives profound insight into the formation of several abbeys throughout Egypt:  St. … Continue reading Pachomius

Teaching as a Spiritual Discipline

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks When I was a fairly new-minted Christian, I was introduced to the concept of spiritual disciplines by the writers Dallas Willard and Richard Foster. Particularly Foster’s Celebration of Discipline helped me enter imaginatively into the role that practices and habit play in spiritual formation. In a culture like ours that values spontaneity and authenticity, it … Continue reading Teaching as a Spiritual Discipline

Permanence and Progress: A Review

By Andrew Pyatt Central to the contemporary classical education movement is a profound appreciation and indebtedness to the past. This devotion to tradition contrasts with the progressivism of modern pedagogy, which views history in terms of an upward climb, an inevitable march of progress. Author and publisher for SLANT books, Gregory Wolfe, however, warns that an equally severe mistake threatens classical education. Wolfe (2017) argues … Continue reading Permanence and Progress: A Review

Wake the Dead with Air Guitars: Adventures in Training 3-Year Old’s in Virtue

By Nathan Carr Vigen Guroian, in his Tending the Heart of Virtue, quotes Flannery O’Connor as having said the following: “a story is a way to say something that can’t be said any other way….You tell a story because a statement would be inadequate.” You are inviting the eye-roll in your three-year old classroom if you simply said, “Olive Kate, you are resisting my role … Continue reading Wake the Dead with Air Guitars: Adventures in Training 3-Year Old’s in Virtue

Mere Mediocrity

By Nathan Carr Tim Wu, a Columbia professor who has written an editorial or two for The New York Times, is concerned that America is losing her hobbies—more alarming, leisure altogether.  To blame: “We’re afraid of being bad at them….if you’re a jogger, it is no longer enough to cruise around the block; you’re training for the next marathon.  If you’re a painter, you are no longer … Continue reading Mere Mediocrity

The Reality of Truth

By Jenna Carey, College of the Ozarks freshman and 2018 graduate of School of the Ozarks Coming from a classical education background, universal truth was ingrained in me as a foundational reality. When people ask if truth changes based on perspective, my initial reaction is to reply, “Of course reality doesn’t change. There’s only one truth and whether or not you accept it is up … Continue reading The Reality of Truth