Writing & Waiting: An Advent Allegory

Following fifteen weeks of instruction, my students sat working on their pinnacle assignment for the semester—a deductive essay on the meaning of words.  I spent the last class period before their essay submission giving them one more tool to check for the connection and flow of their ideas, fielding questions about word choice, and shepherding them through the process of final edits.  We had labored … Continue reading Writing & Waiting: An Advent Allegory

Prometheus or Prodigal? Aristotle on Einstein

By Brianna Kelly, Guest Author What has changed in natural science from the time of the ancient Greeks? The popular caricature sketches ancient science as a primitive, feeble natural fiction with little relevance to today’s students and scientists. In this narrative, Aristotle and the ancients groped stupidly in the cold dark until modern demigods such as Einstein delivered the hidden fire of truth to mortals. … Continue reading Prometheus or Prodigal? Aristotle on Einstein

The Educator as Sherpa

By Jarred Pike, Guest Author In the formidable landscape of learning, students need an advocate who has scaled the ridge for themselves. Sherpas have gained renown for providing specialized support for foreign trekkers and mountain climbers. The Tibetan people who live on the Himalayan slopes serve as apt models of effective teaching in large part because climbers’ lives depend on it. The personal relationship between … Continue reading The Educator as Sherpa

Proposing a Framework for an Education toward Virtue

By Josh Dyson In the section on Justice in his The Four Cardinal Virtues, Josef Pieper states, “Fundamental truths must constantly be pondered anew lest they lose their fruitfulness. In this lies the significance of meditation: that truth may not cease to be present and effective in the active life.”[1] A couple pages later he continues, “… human actions are properly human because they have … Continue reading Proposing a Framework for an Education toward Virtue

It Sounds Like Singing

By Kelly Garrison, Guest Author It sounds like singing! As a description of sound, singing most often refers to the human voice. Birds chirp and machines whine, but people sing. In terms of creation, people are sacredly set apart and created to know, understand, and seek. For the Children’s Sake reminds us that Charlotte Mason specified children as persons, and in her teachings she respected … Continue reading It Sounds Like Singing

Climbing Trees

By Christine Norvell, Guest Author Since we’ve moved to Siloam Springs, I’ve spent plenty of time watching my cat happily climb the old dogwood tree by our garage. Bark chips off as he climbs higher. He often looks back at me as if he wants to know whether he should jump or keep going on his elevated scratching post. It brings to mind the wonder of tree … Continue reading Climbing Trees

Science, Natural History, or Natural Philosophy: What Exactly Are We Calling It These Days?

By Dr. Brian Polk, Guest Author I recently asked a group of science educators that work for Christian Classical Schools if they prefer the term science or natural philosophy, and I’d like to pause to ask you the same. I prefer Natural Philosophy for a few reasons, and some explication is warranted. However, most of it has to do with the meaning, literal and implied, … Continue reading Science, Natural History, or Natural Philosophy: What Exactly Are We Calling It These Days?

The Case for Classical P.E.: A Practical Application for Upper School

By Jenny Crockett, Guest Author “Pupils develop a well-disciplined attitude toward the ‘hard work principle’ in terms of heavy, energy-output type of activities.” This is a quote from Stan LeProtti’s program guide for the La Sierra High School PE program. He expected his students to do hard things. He took a whole man approach to physical education to produce students who were both physically and physiologically fit, … Continue reading The Case for Classical P.E.: A Practical Application for Upper School

Letter to a First Year Teacher

By Dr. Brad Dolloff, Guest Author As head of a classical Christian school, I could not be more thrilled my oldest child has started a career as a classical Christian school teacher. He graduated from School of the Ozarks, the school I helped found on the campus of College of the Ozarks, went on to study at John Brown University (where he studied under Jessica … Continue reading Letter to a First Year Teacher

When the Struggle is Worthwhile

My excitement rose with the sun.  Despite the previous night’s rain—which had served to muddy many of the famed fisheries of Paradise Valley—we were headed for the clear water of DuPuy’s Spring Creek, arguably one of the finest trout waters in Western Montana.  Our guide had warned us that DuPuy’s was a more technical fishery, and some days, expert fishermen leave the creek empty-handed.  Still, … Continue reading When the Struggle is Worthwhile

On Rearranging My Classroom (Mundane Meditations Series)

I’ve found that life presents a series of bizarre paradoxes. One of the more profound of these paradoxes is the desire of everyone to fit in. We all want to belong to something, to feel at home in it—whether it’s a family, a group of friends, a club. But simultaneously, we each like to conceive of ourselves as unique, not like anyone else. We want … Continue reading On Rearranging My Classroom (Mundane Meditations Series)