Power without Purpose

Power without purpose is dangerous and wasteful. I recently finished Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology, a retelling of some of the stories of Odin, Thor, Loki, and the other gods of Norse mythology. I was struck time and again by a lack of purpose in their lives. They possessed an incredible power, yet they lacked any overarching sense of purpose and so they use this power … Continue reading Power without Purpose

Monday Musings (August 14, 2017): A Praying Professor

This past Thursday I returned to work. Arriving early and walking down the empty hallways, it’s always an eerie feeling to think how soon they will be filled with hordes of teenagers. I thought about all of the things I needed to prepare before I was ready, and I knew I was further away than I had hoped. In the days that have followed, I … Continue reading Monday Musings (August 14, 2017): A Praying Professor

Curiosity Doesn’t Kill Anyone

by Christian Lingner, currently a senior at College of the Ozarks Anyone who has spent time in an educational institution or setting has heard time and again the refrains of The Apathetic Student, usually expressed in a phrase like “Why am I being forced to learn this stuff, I’m never going to have to use it” or “I don’t want to have to take this … Continue reading Curiosity Doesn’t Kill Anyone

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (Book Blurbs)

Yesterday Josh Dyson published an excellent piece on Fahrenheit 451, “Freedom in the Fire,” so I thought today would be a good day to share my Book Blurb on the novel as well. I finally got around to reading this book last summer, and I realize I should have done so much sooner. It has features of character development that could be better, but Bradbury’s portrayal of … Continue reading Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (Book Blurbs)

Freedom in the Fire–Fahrenheit 451

by Josh Dyson, Classical School of Wichita Montag: ”I don’t want to change sides and just be told what to do. There’s no reason to change if I do that.” Faber: ”You’re wise already!” The dialogue above between Montag, the protagonist, and Faber, the wise sage, in Ray Bradbury’s 1953 dystopian novel, Fahrenheit 451, takes place in the middle of Montag’s crisis of belief. He … Continue reading Freedom in the Fire–Fahrenheit 451

Monday Musings (August 7, 2017): Reading for Wonder, Imagination, and Joy

Last week Megan Allen posted an article called “Professional Creep: How Work Can Take Over Your Life (and Your Book List)” in which she tells the story of how she was preparing to bring books on grant writing on a vacation. She laments that she has failed to maintain the same joy and wonder that she had as a kid with a bag full of … Continue reading Monday Musings (August 7, 2017): Reading for Wonder, Imagination, and Joy

Political Thought: A Student’s Guide by Hunter Baker (Book Blurbs)

Baker provides a succinct and helpful introduction to political thought. He includes brief surveys of major political philosophers such as Hobbes, Mill, Locke, and Rousseau, as well as surveying some key political themes like justice, order, and freedom. He does an excellent job of surveying the role of government generally and specific Christian contribution to government. This is an excellent introduction in both clarity and … Continue reading Political Thought: A Student’s Guide by Hunter Baker (Book Blurbs)