Classical Christian Education is for the Weak

Like pallbearers they each took a corner of the mat upon which I lay. Into the nave of the chapel the liturgists of the church triumphant bore me, beckoning me: “Say these words… See this symbol… Receive these blessings… Eat this bread… Drink this wine.” Another typical Sunday in which I am escorted into the presence of the One who is the Resurrection and the Life. There at His bidding, by … Continue reading Classical Christian Education is for the Weak

Permanence and Progress: A Review

By Andrew Pyatt Central to the contemporary classical education movement is a profound appreciation and indebtedness to the past. This devotion to tradition contrasts with the progressivism of modern pedagogy, which views history in terms of an upward climb, an inevitable march of progress. Author and publisher for SLANT books, Gregory Wolfe, however, warns that an equally severe mistake threatens classical education. Wolfe (2017) argues … Continue reading Permanence and Progress: A Review

Mechanical Arts and Sense Knowledge (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 2) 

Section 2 Bonaventure first expands upon the exterior light, among which he includes the seven mechanical arts enumerated by Hugh of St. Victor in his Didascalicon: weaving, armor-making, agriculture, hunting, navigation, medicine, and the dramatic art. Bonaventure suggests that all these arts are intended for either consolation or comfort. They are either useful of enjoyable, and their purpose is to banish need or sorrow. In … Continue reading Mechanical Arts and Sense Knowledge (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 2) 

Teaching the Atonement, Part 3: Pedagogy

In the two previous posts I discussed the discord in my students that led me to teach an atonement unit, as well as the transparency I shared about my own struggles and some of the initial questions that I, as well as my students, asked and to which we desired answers. In designing the means by which I would instruct these students—that is, the question … Continue reading Teaching the Atonement, Part 3: Pedagogy

Teaching the Atonement, Part 2: Transparency

I have found that one of the most effective things I can do as a teacher is be transparent with my students. When I am willing to share with them areas of struggle in my own thinking, I think they gather encouragement that they are not alone in their confusion. I can sympathize with their intellectual weaknesses. But I think they also find encouragement in … Continue reading Teaching the Atonement, Part 2: Transparency

Teaching the Atonement, Part 1: Discovering Discord in My Students

As we enter April and Good Friday and Easter are only a few away, it seems a good time to share some experiences from a recent unit I taught on the atonement. I hope this four-part series proves helpful for you in your teaching, but I also hope it serves as a way to prepare your heart for the remembrance of Christ’s sacrifice and the … Continue reading Teaching the Atonement, Part 1: Discovering Discord in My Students

The Necessity of Community (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #6)

Classical Christian education rightly places God at the center of the student’s education. Yet the emphasis on God in the education could have the unintended consequence of causing students to think that their education in Scripture and theology makes involvement in the local church unnecessary. Few go to such an extreme position as to have no involvement, but I have seen students who begin to … Continue reading The Necessity of Community (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #6)