Virtue Ethics: The Dilemma of Postmodern Democracy (Portrait of a Graduate Series)

By Christian Lingner, School of the Ozarks Class of 2014 History reveals three main ways in which societies can be structured or governed. Probably the most historically popular system is that which governs through a top-down approach, employing regulations and obligations to force the common people to comply with the government’s wishes. Another possibility is complete anarchy, simply letting people do as they wish without … Continue reading Virtue Ethics: The Dilemma of Postmodern Democracy (Portrait of a Graduate Series)

Monday Musings (July 31, 2017): Fighting for Time to Read

I recently read an excellent reflection by Phillip Yancey called “Reading Wars” in which he reflects on how easy it is to train ourselves only to read short, blog-like entries and fail to dive into deep and difficult books. Now, please don’t stop reading my short, blog-like entries, but do take care that we also cultivate the difficult skill of analytical reading. My point in … Continue reading Monday Musings (July 31, 2017): Fighting for Time to Read

Nexus Notes–July 28, 2017

A nexus is a series of connections linking two or more things. These notes are dedicated to linking us to great content elsewhere out on the web. Great Audio Library – AmongstLovelyThings.com has a great post with many worthwhile classical Christian education lectures. This is a beneficial link for hours of good listening from great classical speakers. Ten Pedagogical Essentials – A well-done, comprehensive PDF … Continue reading Nexus Notes–July 28, 2017

Stop Loving People, Part 2

By Josh Dyson, Classical School of Wichita If you have not done so, I encourage you to read the introduction to this series, Stop Loving People, Part 1. In this series of blogs we will consider the following: 1. God’s particular love; 2. that the abstraction of “people” leads to non-love; 3. and that God has placed particular people in your schools and lives to … Continue reading Stop Loving People, Part 2

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee (Book Blurbs)

This book was even better than expected. It is thought-provoking, wonderfully written, and told in an interesting way, mixing flashbacks with inward thoughts and dialogue in the flow of the narrative. It is particularly helpful for our present day which still deals with issues of race and the role of the government, both of which stand at the center of the conflict in the novel. … Continue reading Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee (Book Blurbs)

Failure is Not an Option, but It Does Have Consequences (Theology through the Eyes of Fiction)

Failure is Not an Option, but It Does Have Consequences: Eragon’s Blessing and the High Call of Christian Leaders in the Inheritance Saga Near the end of Eragon, (Book 1 of the Inheritance Saga), a woman brings a young girl named Elva to Eragon that he might bless her. Desiring to make the blessing meaningful, Eragon speaks in the ancient language as Saphira (his dragon) touches … Continue reading Failure is Not an Option, but It Does Have Consequences (Theology through the Eyes of Fiction)

Monday Musings (July 24, 2017): Repairing the Ruins of Grades

I wrote a piece not long ago called “Sabermetrics and Grades”in which I discussed the way in which baseball, long known for its love of statistics, has seen a revolution in the scouting, managing, and playing of the game based on advanced statistics–called sabermetrics–that purport to do a better job of identifying those things that impact game outcome. I suggested that we needed a similar … Continue reading Monday Musings (July 24, 2017): Repairing the Ruins of Grades