The Choice of Things to Be Read (Monday Musings)

As I have been preparing my book requests for next school year, I have revisited something I’ve shared before regarding some principles for choosing reading material for classes. In “The Three Columns Revisited,” Mortimer Adler goes into greater detail on the nature of leading seminars in order to help correct some misconceptions about his previous discussion on the three columns from his great work The … Continue reading The Choice of Things to Be Read (Monday Musings)

Freedom and Tolerance

In his 1987 essay entitled “The Three Columns Revisited,”[1] Mortimer Adler has a prophetic word for today about the misconceptions regarding the meaning of the words freedom and tolerance and how they apply to education. Adler writes: “The cultural or intellectual malaise of which I speak can be described as phony tolerance. It denounces as dogmatic and authoritarian anyone who regards one person’s opinion as … Continue reading Freedom and Tolerance

When God Waves Goodbye: Crane’s Theme of the Indifference of God in “The Open Boat”

In his short story “The Open Boat,” Stephen Crane tells a tale that centers around four men in a small dinghy, attempting to reach land after a shipwreck. Sura Rath and Mary Shaw write that “[a] commonplace of Crane criticism is to read ‘The Open Boat’ as a classic story of man’s battle against the malevolent, indifferent, and unpredictable forces of nature” (3). Many of … Continue reading When God Waves Goodbye: Crane’s Theme of the Indifference of God in “The Open Boat”

The Great Divorce: The Problem of Pride and Its Impact on the Separation between Heaven and Hell

The Great Divorce is perhaps one of C. S. Lewis’s most creative works, but it remains also one of his lesser known books.  Lewis, himself, in his preface to the book, calls The Great Divorce a “small book.”[1] In spite of its brevity, The Great Divorce has several theological implications, especially with respect to heaven, hell, and the nature of sin. I hope in this … Continue reading The Great Divorce: The Problem of Pride and Its Impact on the Separation between Heaven and Hell

An Education of Re-Humanization

I’ve been spending significant time lately considering the purpose of education and how we as Christians should be pursuing its proper goal (telos). I’ve given a couple presentations on the topic, and I plan to continue thinking and researching in this direction in the coming months. For example, each of the bold headings below represent an area that I want to expand upon in the … Continue reading An Education of Re-Humanization

Puritan Punishment: Chillingworth as Hawthorne’s Prophet

In his defining work The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne writes a story based upon an act of adultery between Hester Prynne and Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale. Rather than merely writing a story about adultery, however, Hawthorne uses symbolism in the form of a reference to another famous act of adultery in order to present an even bigger issue about his contempt for Puritan punishment. Hawthorne writes … Continue reading Puritan Punishment: Chillingworth as Hawthorne’s Prophet

The Historical Imagination (Landscape of History Series #3)

You can read the first two articles in this series at the following links: “The Purpose of Studying History and the Method of the Historian (Landscape of History Series #1)” “The Teacher, Like the Historian…” (Landscape of History Series #2)” In chapter 2 of The Landscape of History, John Lewis Gaddis discusses time and space, which he identifies as “the field in which history happens … Continue reading The Historical Imagination (Landscape of History Series #3)