Faithful Learning (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #3)

In the previous post in this series (The Character of the Teacher) we considered the high calling of the classical Christian educator. In this post we focus on the character of the student. Many students at classical Christian schools still struggle with the sacred and secular distinctions that are so stark in government education. Despite being told that their faith informs every aspect of their … Continue reading Faithful Learning (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #3)

What a Rubik’s Cube Taught Me About Teaching

My son received a Rubik’s Cube this last Christmas, but it wasn’t the first one he had received. We had given him one the year before, but it ended up slipping through a worm hole shortly thereafter. This year a second cube appeared around Christmas (whether it be a new one or the old one re-emerging from the alternate dimension, I cannot say for certain). … Continue reading What a Rubik’s Cube Taught Me About Teaching

The Character of the Teacher (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #2)

Classical Christian education is, and ought to be, a rigorous endeavor. And not just for the student. Teachers, too, have a high calling to be learned. I remember when we first started our school nearly seven years ago—I was halfway through my PhD in Old Testament, and one of my first realizations was how much I didn’t know. The more that I learn, the more … Continue reading The Character of the Teacher (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #2)

Walking with James Schall

By Christine Norvell James V. Schall, S.J. “The Metaphysics of Walking.” The Life of the Mind: On the Joys and Travails of Thinking. Wilmington: ISI Books, 2006. Our society is completely dependent upon not only technology, but also the quickness and ease with which we get what we want —information, entertainment, things. Within most of us, the natural consequence is a pervasive impatience, a quickness … Continue reading Walking with James Schall

A Few More Thoughts on Classical Pedagogy: A Response to Ian Mosley and Joshua Gibbs

In response to Ian Mosely’s recent blog post, I agree that with older students, question-asking and roundtable discussion are indispensable methods for learning and important preparation for what lies ahead.  As a college writing instructor, I often lament the inability (or disinterest) of students to participate in discussion of the main ideas and key questions of a text.  They simply want me to disseminate the … Continue reading A Few More Thoughts on Classical Pedagogy: A Response to Ian Mosley and Joshua Gibbs

B. B. Warfield on Theological Education (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #1)

In his excellent short essay, The Religious Life of Theological Students, B. B. Warfield gives advice to the theological student about the kind of person he or she should be. Too often our focus on theological education is merely the information to be learned. But Warfield argues it is just as, or more important, that the proper formation is happening in the student. As I … Continue reading B. B. Warfield on Theological Education (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #1)