Illumination and The Mechanical Arts (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 7) 

Illumination and The Mechanical Arts (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 7)  Sections 11-14 In section 11, Bonaventure moves on from sense knowledge to show how divine wisdom likewise illumines the mechanical arts. Bonaventure compares the mechanical arts to sense knowledge because both deal with the generation and incarnation of the Word, the pattern of human life, and the union … Continue reading Illumination and The Mechanical Arts (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 7) 

Pachomius

By Nathan Carr With an unobstructed view to Joy, let us go back to the first school tradition of the Christian Church—the monastery.  How did the first attempt at formal Christian education enlist its students into the great “story being told?”  Among the monastic schoolmasters of the 4th century—abbots and abbesses—one in particular gives profound insight into the formation of several abbeys throughout Egypt:  St. … Continue reading Pachomius

Mechanical Arts and Sense Knowledge (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 2) 

Section 2 Bonaventure first expands upon the exterior light, among which he includes the seven mechanical arts enumerated by Hugh of St. Victor in his Didascalicon: weaving, armor-making, agriculture, hunting, navigation, medicine, and the dramatic art. Bonaventure suggests that all these arts are intended for either consolation or comfort. They are either useful of enjoyable, and their purpose is to banish need or sorrow. In … Continue reading Mechanical Arts and Sense Knowledge (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 2) 

St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology (Part 1)

One of the more helpful books I read last year on education was St. Bonaventure’s On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology. Over the course of the next couple months I hope to write a series of posts on this book. Each post will provide a brief summary of the content followed by reflections on how his insights in the 13th century can help … Continue reading St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology (Part 1)

Lessons from Dolores, Dumbledore, and More (Educational Insights from Hogwarts #1)

I recently re-read Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, and perhaps on account of all the study I have been doing about classical Christian education, it struck me how much of this book was about educational philosophy. I was even more surprised that despite the reality that Dolores Umbridge is cast in an evil light and Albus Dumbledore as the hero, the wisdom … Continue reading Lessons from Dolores, Dumbledore, and More (Educational Insights from Hogwarts #1)

Curiosity Doesn’t Kill Anyone

by Christian Lingner, currently a senior at College of the Ozarks Anyone who has spent time in an educational institution or setting has heard time and again the refrains of The Apathetic Student, usually expressed in a phrase like “Why am I being forced to learn this stuff, I’m never going to have to use it” or “I don’t want to have to take this … Continue reading Curiosity Doesn’t Kill Anyone

What Scares Me About Classical Education

In his Confessions Augustine recounts his early education, an education which many of us would be proud to impart to our own children. From a young age he was steeped in the Greek tragedies, Roman histories, and classical languages of Greek and Latin. Yet as he reflects upon these matters he expresses deep sorrow over how his heart was led astray by his own carnal lusts … Continue reading What Scares Me About Classical Education

Harkness Sharkness

Don’t you just love the movies that depict the shark getting the faintest whiff of blood and putting your least favorite character in peril? I have often felt like this character who accidentally cut himself as the teacher during a harkness discussion. I have introduced this format of discussion to my students, and on occasion, I have unknowingly baited the water. The sharks have caught … Continue reading Harkness Sharkness

This Democracy Will Self-Destruct in 5, 4, 3…

“…are you not ashamed that you care for having as much money as possible, and reputation, and honor, but that you neither care for nor give thought to prudence, and trust, and how your soul will be the best possible?”[1]The above question is what Socrates asks of the jury of his peers as they are about to sentence him to death. Is this question not … Continue reading This Democracy Will Self-Destruct in 5, 4, 3…

Monday Musings (October 30, 2017): Education, the Path to True Humanity?

“Education is our path to true humanity and wisdom”[1] ~Stratford Caldecott, Beauty for Truth’s Sake, 11 One of the more difficult challenges with classical Christian education is clarifying our end goal. I wrote on this recently in my post “Is Repairing the Ruins our Goal?”, and I suggested that we have the two-fold goal of excellent education and Christian discipleship. In Beauty for Truth’s Sake, … Continue reading Monday Musings (October 30, 2017): Education, the Path to True Humanity?

The Hidden Dangers of Spa Water

The following is an analogy to consider for those who have their kids in government or secular schools. This analogy is intended for those who might raise the objection that if they can teach their kids what things to avoid (e.g. Evolution) then there is no real danger for their children in the public/government/secular schools. I hope that this analogy helps illustrate the flaw in … Continue reading The Hidden Dangers of Spa Water