Are you an “Essential Worker”?

The first I heard of the potential of someone carrying around a letter from their employer stating that they are “Essential” to the operation of their organization, I thought to myself, “Well, aren’t they special?” Over the past number of weeks, due to COVID-19, companies and organizations have sought to justify their operation (and potential existence) as being “Essential” to the operation of society. From … Continue reading Are you an “Essential Worker”?

Illumination and The Mechanical Arts (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 7) 

Illumination and The Mechanical Arts (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 7)  Sections 11-14 In section 11, Bonaventure moves on from sense knowledge to show how divine wisdom likewise illumines the mechanical arts. Bonaventure compares the mechanical arts to sense knowledge because both deal with the generation and incarnation of the Word, the pattern of human life, and the union … Continue reading Illumination and The Mechanical Arts (St. Bonaventure, On the Reduction of the Arts to Theology, Part 7) 

The Case for Classical P.E.

The Case for Classical PE Jenny Crockett A more classical PE? Can we really apply the classical model that we use in the classroom to physical education?  Absolutely!  Children today need the “lost tools” of a physical education more than ever. Physical literacy, understanding how and why the human body works and how it was created to move, is a vital skill that has been … Continue reading The Case for Classical P.E.

Permanence and Progress: A Review

By Andrew Pyatt Central to the contemporary classical education movement is a profound appreciation and indebtedness to the past. This devotion to tradition contrasts with the progressivism of modern pedagogy, which views history in terms of an upward climb, an inevitable march of progress. Author and publisher for SLANT books, Gregory Wolfe, however, warns that an equally severe mistake threatens classical education. Wolfe (2017) argues … Continue reading Permanence and Progress: A Review

B. B. Warfield on Theological Education (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #1)

In his excellent short essay, The Religious Life of Theological Students, B. B. Warfield gives advice to the theological student about the kind of person he or she should be. Too often our focus on theological education is merely the information to be learned. But Warfield argues it is just as, or more important, that the proper formation is happening in the student. As I … Continue reading B. B. Warfield on Theological Education (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #1)

Moving Forward: Classically Educating Children With Special Needs

I’ve happily noticed a recent surge of interest in addressing children with special needs in classical Christian education. Writers and educators have noted that this is an area of weakness in the resurgence of classical Christian education. Due to school size, staffing, and perhaps a general lack of energy or time to devote to the issue, addressing special needs has simply not fallen within the … Continue reading Moving Forward: Classically Educating Children With Special Needs

Classical Roundup – April 27th, 2018

The Classical Roundup is a group of worthwhile articles, videos, and podcasts that I have found helpful on our journey of exploring classical Christian education in the 21stcentury.  My Son Is Very Smart – “Christ did not choose smart disciples. He chose men who could be taught” – Joshua Gibbs.   Dad the Dragon Slayer– Matt Bianco encourages Dads to help train their children to … Continue reading Classical Roundup – April 27th, 2018

On Aristotle and Happiness

By Christine Norvell Humanity of every age and culture has sought a sense of purpose, often in semantics—perhaps fulfillment, contentment, joy, pleasure, satisfaction, or happiness add meaning to our life on earth. However, some of these words appear interconnected or lend to a dichotomy, either relating to the physical senses or to intuitive ones. Aristotle saw how these separate terms could intertwine to define happiness: … Continue reading On Aristotle and Happiness

Classical Roundup – Prom!

The Classical Roundup is a group of worthwhile articles, videos, and podcasts that I have found helpful on our journey of exploring classical Christian education in the 21stcentury. Prom vs. Protocol – Afraid of Putting on Dancing Shoes? Prom A Better Way It’s called the night that you will remember for the rest of your life… high school prom… yet for most of us, prom … Continue reading Classical Roundup – Prom!

Why Classical Education is the Future

By Dr. Steve Turley   There’s an interesting term that’s developed among scholars over the last several years: retraditionalization. While certainly a bit cumbersome, it is a rather simple and indeed profound concept. In the face of threats to a sense of place, identity, and security so often posed by globalization, populations tend to reassert historic identity and security markers – religion, custom, and tradition … Continue reading Why Classical Education is the Future

A Classical Christian School—Two Centuries Ago

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks “But isn’t the whole point of our movement that we already are doing things the way they were done two centuries ago?” The way we describe our own movement can sometimes be confusing. It is sometimes framed as a “recovery” of a way of education that has been lost, which would seem to imply that … Continue reading A Classical Christian School—Two Centuries Ago

Classical Roundup–March 30th, 2018

The Classical Roundup is a group of worthwhile articles, videos, and podcasts that I have found helpful on our journey of exploring classical Christian education in the 21stcentury.   What is classical Christian education? And why is it so important? Dr. Steve Turley explains what classical Christian education is really all about.   Paul David Tripp tackles the question as to what is the daily … Continue reading Classical Roundup–March 30th, 2018