What a Rubik’s Cube Taught Me About Teaching

My son received a Rubik’s Cube this last Christmas, but it wasn’t the first one he had received. We had given him one the year before, but it ended up slipping through a worm hole shortly thereafter. This year a second cube appeared around Christmas (whether it be a new one or the old one re-emerging from the alternate dimension, I cannot say for certain). … Continue reading What a Rubik’s Cube Taught Me About Teaching

Classical Roundup – July 6th, 2018

The Classical Roundup is a group of worthwhile articles, videos, and podcasts that I have found helpful on our journey of exploring classical Christian education in the 21stcentury.    Socratic Circles are a high school debate technique where students wrestle with ideas, rather than each other. Former Director of Education Matt Bianco gives tips for leading Socratic circles of any size.   How Can We Tweet to … Continue reading Classical Roundup – July 6th, 2018

Seven Laws of Teaching

One work that has received significant attention in classical Christian schools is The Seven Laws of Teaching by John Milton Gregory.[1] In this work, Gregory lays out seven laws and explains why they are helpful guidelines for teaching effectively. The work, first published in 1886, predates modern ideas of education and therefore serves as a helpful “return” to what classical Christian educators believe is a … Continue reading Seven Laws of Teaching

“Mere Christian Education”?: the Challenges and Possibilities of Ecumenism in Classical Christian Education

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks “But there is one good point which both these churches have in common — they are both party churches. I think I warned you before that if your patient can’t be kept out of the Church, he ought at least to be violently attached to some party within it. I don’t mean on really doctrinal … Continue reading “Mere Christian Education”?: the Challenges and Possibilities of Ecumenism in Classical Christian Education

Showing, Telling, and Teaching

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks Some of my favorite courses in college were creative writing courses. My major, however, wasn’t English, and I had no interest in becoming an author. The reason I kept taking them was because I loved the way they challenged me to view the world differently. The untrained are apt to record their daily experiences as … Continue reading Showing, Telling, and Teaching