How to Learn a Language

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks The old saying is true—“familiarity breeds contempt”—but that isn’t even half the problem. Familiarity also leads to comfort, and the human mind does odd things when it is comfortable. G. K. Chesterton wrote his wonderful book The Everlasting Man, he said, to re-present the Christian west as if examining an alien country, so that, the … Continue reading How to Learn a Language

Essence Matters

By Dan Snyder A dusty concept now set aside by productive people, the notion of essence and the possibility of the essential appears extra to the tasks of living and enjoying, or the pursuit of happiness. Truly, this old concept may stand in the way of immediate gratification. An idea that the early Greeks who concerned themselves with the ‘ontos’ or the world of beings … Continue reading Essence Matters

“Mere Christian Education”?: the Challenges and Possibilities of Ecumenism in Classical Christian Education

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks “But there is one good point which both these churches have in common — they are both party churches. I think I warned you before that if your patient can’t be kept out of the Church, he ought at least to be violently attached to some party within it. I don’t mean on really doctrinal … Continue reading “Mere Christian Education”?: the Challenges and Possibilities of Ecumenism in Classical Christian Education

Why We Should See Live Performances

By Christine Norvell Recently our entire high school of 125 students and a handful of teachers saw Thornton Wilder’s play Our Town at a local university, free I might add. For a play written in 1938, it was indeed a snapshot of its time approaching mid-century America post World War I and the Great Depression. After a country had seen so much loss of life … Continue reading Why We Should See Live Performances

Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood Book Review

By Christine Norvell “I fancy I have never written a book in which I did not quote from him. But it has not seemed to me that those who have received my books kindly take even now sufficient notice of the affiliation. Honesty drives me to emphasize it.”—C.S. Lewis I can’t explain it as well as I’d like, but there’s something to George MacDonald’s preachy … Continue reading Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood Book Review

A Francis Option?

By Craig McElvain     Why “Benedict” ? Being a student of history, I find myself in total harmony with author Rod Dreher’s sense that the church must pull back from our current cultural milieu if it is to survive in post-modern America. This isn’t the first time that the church has been swallowed up into the culture (the first being the Constantinian church of … Continue reading A Francis Option?

The Abolition of Education: A Warning from C.S. Lewis

By Steve Turley, Tall Oaks Classical School and Eastern University TurleyTalks.com There is no doubt that the 1940s constituted a most historically formidable decade: the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, WWII, the advent of the Atomic bomb, the transformation of the U.S. into a global super power, the establishment of NATO, and the founding of the People’s Republic of China. Yet among these notable events … Continue reading The Abolition of Education: A Warning from C.S. Lewis

Loosen Your Bow Strings

By Jenni Carey, School of the Ozarks I am currently taking a class over the writings of Herodotus and Thucydides.[1] Along with the enjoyment of reading Herodotus’s unique narrative style (a delightful mix of literature, poetry, geographical description, and historical events) I am finding nuggets of wisdom and truth, quite valuable to those of us trying to survive in the world of classical Christian education … Continue reading Loosen Your Bow Strings

Why are We Teaching a Dead Language? Latin’s Ability to Transform Students

By Jenni Carey, School of the Ozarks It happens every year. Some student or parent comes to me, the K-8 Coordinator of our small classical Christian school, with a daunting and urgent concern. Why do we torture our poor students by forcing them to sit through Latin classes? Isn’t Latin a dead language? What possible practical benefits could students be acquiring from learning a language that … Continue reading Why are We Teaching a Dead Language? Latin’s Ability to Transform Students

Hateful Achilles

By Dan Snyder, Classical School of Wichita Hateful Achilles When we talk about prospects of life for a student who has chosen the humanities as a course of study, we always fight the headwind of pragmatism that pushes toward the question “but what will they do?” Most young people are concerned with joining the adult world, whatever that may be, and they covet the signs … Continue reading Hateful Achilles

Sincerity, Silence and Stability: Cordelia’s Embodiment of Wisdom in King Lear

By Jenni Carey, School of the Ozarks In Act I of Shakespeare’s King Lear, Goneril and Regan, Lear’s eldest daughters, choose to humor their aged father with embellished, empty expressions in order to gain wealth. Cordelia, however, sets her speech apart from the flattery of her sisters by speaking simply and honestly from her heart. For this, she loses her inheritance and suffers the wrath … Continue reading Sincerity, Silence and Stability: Cordelia’s Embodiment of Wisdom in King Lear