The Best Shakespeare Story Ever

By Christine Norvell It was a classic when it was first published in 1949, but it remains a classic because it is one-of-a-kind. Marchette Chute’s Shakespeare of London[1] absolutely is the best biography because of her approach. Chute essentially crafted the story of Shakespeare’s life from a paper trail, from wherever she could find town records, lease arrangements, tax papers, theatre programs, personal letters, and … Continue reading The Best Shakespeare Story Ever

What’re You Going to Do with Socrates?

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks Tom was not raised a Christian. Growing up, his family never went to church, never read the Bible together or practiced family prayer or worship. Nevertheless, he was lucky to have two parents who loved him, made sure he got a good education (by their own best lights, of course), and always encouraged his voracious … Continue reading What’re You Going to Do with Socrates?

Sonnet for the First Week in Lent

By Ian Mosley The dawn does not disperse, but in fact removes the image even of the dark which just one moment past, in cloak intact and seamless seemed to own the world–remark the ways in which our mind cannot embrace contráries: ashen bones cannot be raised, the purest hyssop won’t our filth efface, but rather death will drag us where none are praised. But … Continue reading Sonnet for the First Week in Lent

Learning Disabilities and the Classical School

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks The human immune system is a complex bit of machinery. As it learns to define and identify potential threats, it has immense potential to protect us from disease; of course, the most effective diseases find ways around easy identification, using their protean disguises to slip past our defenses. Moreover, having an overzealous immune system can … Continue reading Learning Disabilities and the Classical School

How to Learn a Language

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks The old saying is true—“familiarity breeds contempt”—but that isn’t even half the problem. Familiarity also leads to comfort, and the human mind does odd things when it is comfortable. G. K. Chesterton wrote his wonderful book The Everlasting Man, he said, to re-present the Christian west as if examining an alien country, so that, the … Continue reading How to Learn a Language

Essence Matters

By Dan Snyder A dusty concept now set aside by productive people, the notion of essence and the possibility of the essential appears extra to the tasks of living and enjoying, or the pursuit of happiness. Truly, this old concept may stand in the way of immediate gratification. An idea that the early Greeks who concerned themselves with the ‘ontos’ or the world of beings … Continue reading Essence Matters

“Mere Christian Education”?: the Challenges and Possibilities of Ecumenism in Classical Christian Education

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks “But there is one good point which both these churches have in common — they are both party churches. I think I warned you before that if your patient can’t be kept out of the Church, he ought at least to be violently attached to some party within it. I don’t mean on really doctrinal … Continue reading “Mere Christian Education”?: the Challenges and Possibilities of Ecumenism in Classical Christian Education

Showing, Telling, and Teaching

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks Some of my favorite courses in college were creative writing courses. My major, however, wasn’t English, and I had no interest in becoming an author. The reason I kept taking them was because I loved the way they challenged me to view the world differently. The untrained are apt to record their daily experiences as … Continue reading Showing, Telling, and Teaching

Why We Should See Live Performances

By Christine Norvell Recently our entire high school of 125 students and a handful of teachers saw Thornton Wilder’s play Our Town at a local university, free I might add. For a play written in 1938, it was indeed a snapshot of its time approaching mid-century America post World War I and the Great Depression. After a country had seen so much loss of life … Continue reading Why We Should See Live Performances

Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood Book Review

By Christine Norvell “I fancy I have never written a book in which I did not quote from him. But it has not seemed to me that those who have received my books kindly take even now sufficient notice of the affiliation. Honesty drives me to emphasize it.”—C.S. Lewis I can’t explain it as well as I’d like, but there’s something to George MacDonald’s preachy … Continue reading Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood Book Review

Curiosity Doesn’t Kill Anyone

by Christian Lingner, currently a senior at College of the Ozarks Anyone who has spent time in an educational institution or setting has heard time and again the refrains of The Apathetic Student, usually expressed in a phrase like “Why am I being forced to learn this stuff, I’m never going to have to use it” or “I don’t want to have to take this … Continue reading Curiosity Doesn’t Kill Anyone

Freedom in the Fire–Fahrenheit 451

by Josh Dyson, Classical School of Wichita Montag: ”I don’t want to change sides and just be told what to do. There’s no reason to change if I do that.” Faber: ”You’re wise already!” The dialogue above between Montag, the protagonist, and Faber, the wise sage, in Ray Bradbury’s 1953 dystopian novel, Fahrenheit 451, takes place in the middle of Montag’s crisis of belief. He … Continue reading Freedom in the Fire–Fahrenheit 451