Why the Great Books Are Classical And Christian

The following is one of the sessions from our 2019 Conference co-hosted by School of the Ozarks and held at the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO.  Why the Great Books Are Classical And Christian (And Therefore Why You Should Read Them) This presentation will explore the related origins and overlapping aims of the modern classical Christian education and Great Books movements, arguing … Continue reading Why the Great Books Are Classical And Christian

Tales within Tales

The following is one of the sessions from our 2019 Conference co-hosted by School of the Ozarks and held at the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO.  Tales within Tales It is a storyteller’s privilege. As readers, we delight in knitting our imagination to that of characters’ to hear a story within the plot as joint audience. We sit a spell at the … Continue reading Tales within Tales

Profile of a Graduate – What is the Grammar Teacher’s Role (2019 Conference Presentation)

The following is one of the sessions from our 2019 Conference co-hosted by School of the Ozarks and held at the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO.    Profile of a Graduate – What is the Grammar Teacher’s Role Kevin Thames, Classical School of Wichita Have you ever seen Logic or Rhetoric teachers having a conversation about teaching their students the ideas of … Continue reading Profile of a Graduate – What is the Grammar Teacher’s Role (2019 Conference Presentation)

Classical Christian Education is for the Weak

Like pallbearers they each took a corner of the mat upon which I lay. Into the nave of the chapel the liturgists of the church triumphant bore me, beckoning me: “Say these words… See this symbol… Receive these blessings… Eat this bread… Drink this wine.” Another typical Sunday in which I am escorted into the presence of the One who is the Resurrection and the Life. There at His bidding, by … Continue reading Classical Christian Education is for the Weak

A Review of Gene Edward Veith’s Loving God with All Your Mind

By Jessica Burke Veith, Gene Edward, Jr. Loving God with All Your Mind: Thinking as a Christian in a Postmodern World. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2003. When I graduated from college, a sense of finality and relief washed over me. That stage of life was finally over. My education was done. Except, by the grace of God, it wasn’t. Shortly after my graduation, my husband started … Continue reading A Review of Gene Edward Veith’s Loving God with All Your Mind

A Few More Thoughts on Classical Pedagogy: A Response to Ian Mosley and Joshua Gibbs

In response to Ian Mosely’s recent blog post, I agree that with older students, question-asking and roundtable discussion are indispensable methods for learning and important preparation for what lies ahead.  As a college writing instructor, I often lament the inability (or disinterest) of students to participate in discussion of the main ideas and key questions of a text.  They simply want me to disseminate the … Continue reading A Few More Thoughts on Classical Pedagogy: A Response to Ian Mosley and Joshua Gibbs

B. B. Warfield on Theological Education (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #1)

In his excellent short essay, The Religious Life of Theological Students, B. B. Warfield gives advice to the theological student about the kind of person he or she should be. Too often our focus on theological education is merely the information to be learned. But Warfield argues it is just as, or more important, that the proper formation is happening in the student. As I … Continue reading B. B. Warfield on Theological Education (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #1)

Classical Roundup – December 28th, 2018

The Classical Roundup is a group of worthwhile articles, videos, and podcasts that I have found helpful on our journey of exploring classical Christian education in the 21stcentury. This video is an overview of a classical Christian education school that is located in Uganda. Amazing story about how this school came about and if you have time, I would recommend you learn more about Amazima to be … Continue reading Classical Roundup – December 28th, 2018

Teaching to the Test (Educational Insights from Hogwarts, Part 10)

We are now on to the second half of our 10 part series on Educational Insights from Hogwarts. If you missed any of the previous articles, check them out at the links below. Part 1: Lessons from Dolores, Dumbledore, and More Part 2: Private Christian Schools and Government Involvement Part 3: Meaningful Teacher Evaluations Part 4: Student Organizations Part 5: On the Integration of Subjects/Arts … Continue reading Teaching to the Test (Educational Insights from Hogwarts, Part 10)

Intellectual Humility (Educational Insights from Hogwarts, Part 8)

One of the better educational moves that Dumbledore makes in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is to add Firenze the Centaur to his teaching staff. Firenze is to share the duties of divination with Professor Trelawney, but unlike Trelawney, Firenze seems actually to know his subject. Nevertheless, Rowling writes that Firenze’s “priority did not seem to be to teach them what he … Continue reading Intellectual Humility (Educational Insights from Hogwarts, Part 8)

On the Integration of Subjects/Arts (Educational Insights from Hogwarts, Part 5)

On the Integration of Subjects/Arts (Educational Insights from Hogwarts, Part 5) As I continue this series on educational insights we glean from Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, I have decided to skip three of the educational decrees because they have a great deal of overlap and are related more to the administrative side of the school and the handling of punishments. Educational … Continue reading On the Integration of Subjects/Arts (Educational Insights from Hogwarts, Part 5)