Teaching the Atonement, Part 4: Some Conclusions

One of the more overlooked aspects of atonement theories is the importance of the resurrection. Paul says in 1 Corinthians 15:17 that if Christ is not raised then “your faith is futile and you are still in your sins.” Here I think we have a possible aid to our assessment of atonement theories. To Paul, Christ’s death apart from his resurrection makes nonsense of Christ’s … Continue reading Teaching the Atonement, Part 4: Some Conclusions

Teaching the Atonement, Part 3: Pedagogy

In the two previous posts I discussed the discord in my students that led me to teach an atonement unit, as well as the transparency I shared about my own struggles and some of the initial questions that I, as well as my students, asked and to which we desired answers. In designing the means by which I would instruct these students—that is, the question … Continue reading Teaching the Atonement, Part 3: Pedagogy

Teaching the Atonement, Part 2: Transparency

I have found that one of the most effective things I can do as a teacher is be transparent with my students. When I am willing to share with them areas of struggle in my own thinking, I think they gather encouragement that they are not alone in their confusion. I can sympathize with their intellectual weaknesses. But I think they also find encouragement in … Continue reading Teaching the Atonement, Part 2: Transparency

Teaching the Atonement, Part 1: Discovering Discord in My Students

As we enter April and Good Friday and Easter are only a few away, it seems a good time to share some experiences from a recent unit I taught on the atonement. I hope this four-part series proves helpful for you in your teaching, but I also hope it serves as a way to prepare your heart for the remembrance of Christ’s sacrifice and the … Continue reading Teaching the Atonement, Part 1: Discovering Discord in My Students

A Vocation of Education for Teachers and Students (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #5)

In their pursuit of the American dream, many often speak of jobs and careers that will help them achieve their goals. What we have lost in this pursuit, however, is the older notion of vocation. A vocation, a calling, has much richer and deeper biblical roots than careers. One of the important roles of classical Christian education, I believe, is recapturing the notion of vocation, … Continue reading A Vocation of Education for Teachers and Students (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #5)

Bringing Christ to Class (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #4)

For all of its incredible benefits, classical Christian education can be dangerous. If we educate students to be excellent thinkers and communicators but they fail to learn virtue, we have created monsters. Among these dangers, I think two lie before students in classical Christian education with special respect to their faith. The first danger is that students learn a lot of truth about God but … Continue reading Bringing Christ to Class (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #4)

Faithful Learning (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #3)

In the previous post in this series (The Character of the Teacher) we considered the high calling of the classical Christian educator. In this post we focus on the character of the student. Many students at classical Christian schools still struggle with the sacred and secular distinctions that are so stark in government education. Despite being told that their faith informs every aspect of their … Continue reading Faithful Learning (Reflections on B. B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students #3)