Monday Musings (September 4, 2017): Virtuous and Sinful Learners

In the Preface to his Didascalicon, Hugh of Saint Victor observes that intellect comes to each man or woman in different measure. Some are blessed with a profound intellect, while “there are many persons whose nature has left them so poor in ability that they can hardly grasp with their intellect even easy things.”[1] Of the latter he identifies two types of people: the one … Continue reading Monday Musings (September 4, 2017): Virtuous and Sinful Learners

Monday Musings (August 28, 2017): The Lost Art of Christian Storytelling

“What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done, and there is nothing new under the sun.” ~Ecclesiastes 1:9 The words of the Preacher in Ecclesiastes 1:9 are perhaps never as true as when one applies them to modern Christian storytelling, whether in fiction or the movies. The same stories are being told over and over again, … Continue reading Monday Musings (August 28, 2017): The Lost Art of Christian Storytelling

Monday Musings (August 21, 2017): Irrigating Deserts

In his phenomenal work The Abolition of Man, C. S. Lewis writes regarding education what have become some of his most well-known and oft-quoted words: “For every one pupil who needs to be guarded from a weak excess of sensibility there are three who need to be awakened from the slumber of cold vulgarity. The task of the modern educator is not to cut down … Continue reading Monday Musings (August 21, 2017): Irrigating Deserts

Monday Musings (August 14, 2017): A Praying Professor

This past Thursday I returned to work. Arriving early and walking down the empty hallways, it’s always an eerie feeling to think how soon they will be filled with hordes of teenagers. I thought about all of the things I needed to prepare before I was ready, and I knew I was further away than I had hoped. In the days that have followed, I … Continue reading Monday Musings (August 14, 2017): A Praying Professor

Monday Musings (August 7, 2017): Reading for Wonder, Imagination, and Joy

Last week Megan Allen posted an article called “Professional Creep: How Work Can Take Over Your Life (and Your Book List)” in which she tells the story of how she was preparing to bring books on grant writing on a vacation. She laments that she has failed to maintain the same joy and wonder that she had as a kid with a bag full of … Continue reading Monday Musings (August 7, 2017): Reading for Wonder, Imagination, and Joy

Monday Musings (July 31, 2017): Fighting for Time to Read

I recently read an excellent reflection by Phillip Yancey called “Reading Wars” in which he reflects on how easy it is to train ourselves only to read short, blog-like entries and fail to dive into deep and difficult books. Now, please don’t stop reading my short, blog-like entries, but do take care that we also cultivate the difficult skill of analytical reading. My point in … Continue reading Monday Musings (July 31, 2017): Fighting for Time to Read

Monday Musings (July 24, 2017): Repairing the Ruins of Grades

I wrote a piece not long ago called “Sabermetrics and Grades”in which I discussed the way in which baseball, long known for its love of statistics, has seen a revolution in the scouting, managing, and playing of the game based on advanced statistics–called sabermetrics–that purport to do a better job of identifying those things that impact game outcome. I suggested that we needed a similar … Continue reading Monday Musings (July 24, 2017): Repairing the Ruins of Grades

Monday Musings (July 17, 2017): School Flourishing

I’m sitting in an auto shop waiting on my car to be inspected and serviced, and I began thinking about Plato’s Republic, specifically the part where he discusses how each person has their part to play in a just society–cobblers make the shoes, bakers bake, and so on. As each person does his job well, the community can flourish. If, however, everyone tried to do … Continue reading Monday Musings (July 17, 2017): School Flourishing

Monday Musings (July 10, 2017): Reading Journals

I have always valued owning books over borrowing them from libraries. The most significant reason for this otherwise terrible financial decision is that learning is worth the cost, and I learn much better by making notes and highlights in my own books and occasionally reading back through those than I do from merely reading a book and returning it. But despite highlights, underlines, notes, and … Continue reading Monday Musings (July 10, 2017): Reading Journals

Monday Musings (July 3, 2017): Story, Memory, and Home

I had the pleasure this past Friday of watching two boys of some friends of ours who were preparing to move, then helping our friends load the truck on Saturday as they moved into their first home. I was reminded of what a wonderful thing a home is, and how my memories of my childhood home are still vivid in my memory. Below I have … Continue reading Monday Musings (July 3, 2017): Story, Memory, and Home

Monday Musings (June 12, 2017): The Choice of Things to Be Read

In “The Three Columns Revisited,”[1] Mortimer Adler goes into greater detail on the nature of leading seminars in order to help correct some misconceptions about his previous discussion on the three columns from his great work The Padeia Proposal. One of the more interesting discussions in this essay relates to the choice of reading for the seminar. Adler provides four guidelines. First, and what Adler … Continue reading Monday Musings (June 12, 2017): The Choice of Things to Be Read