Is Repairing the Ruins Our Goal?

Back in the spring I had an excellent conversation with another classical Christian educator who asked whether we were right to define our endeavors along the lines of John Milton’s idea that we were repairing the ruins of Adam and Eve so that we might love and imitate God. This educator proposed that, as Christians, although this was our goal in the Christian life, our … Continue reading Is Repairing the Ruins Our Goal?

Monday Musings (October 2, 2017): Meditating on the Great Books—Some Practical Steps

The past several weeks I have been exploring the notion of meditation,[1] first upon Scripture, but then suggesting that this could apply to the Great Books as well, albeit with a different authority. One of the ways we can meditate on the Great Books is by recognizing that we are not passive recipients of the Great Books but actually active participants in the same story … Continue reading Monday Musings (October 2, 2017): Meditating on the Great Books—Some Practical Steps

Monday Musings (September 25, 2017): Meditation as Participation

Last week I considered how we have tamed God’s Word instead of eating it. This week I continue the theme of meditating on the written word. One of the better insights of Eugene Peterson’s excellent book, Eat This Book: A Conversation in the Art of Spiritual Reading, is his proposal that spiritual reading is “participatory reading.”[1] He uses the illustration of a period of life … Continue reading Monday Musings (September 25, 2017): Meditation as Participation

Monday Musings (September 18, 2017): Lectio Divina and the Monster Book of Monsters

Lectio Divina and the Monster Book of Monsters: Harry Potter, Eugene Peterson, and the Art of Spiritual Reading Note: Last week I discussed Hugh of Saint Victor’s two things “by which every man advances in knowledge”: reading and meditation. This week I want to explore in some more detail the topic of meditation as it is specifically applied to the Bible. In Harry’s third year … Continue reading Monday Musings (September 18, 2017): Lectio Divina and the Monster Book of Monsters

Monday Musings (September 11, 2017): Reading and Meditation

Last week I discussed the first part of the Preface in Hugh of Saint Victor’s work, Didascalicon, particularly the way he identifies four varieties of learners, two virtuous and two sinful. For the virtuous learner who truly desires to grow and use his gifts of intellect (however great or meager they may be), Hugh of Saint Victor suggests that there are two things “by which … Continue reading Monday Musings (September 11, 2017): Reading and Meditation

Monday Musings (September 4, 2017): Virtuous and Sinful Learners

In the Preface to his Didascalicon, Hugh of Saint Victor observes that intellect comes to each man or woman in different measure. Some are blessed with a profound intellect, while “there are many persons whose nature has left them so poor in ability that they can hardly grasp with their intellect even easy things.”[1] Of the latter he identifies two types of people: the one … Continue reading Monday Musings (September 4, 2017): Virtuous and Sinful Learners

Monday Musings (August 28, 2017): The Lost Art of Christian Storytelling

“What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done, and there is nothing new under the sun.” ~Ecclesiastes 1:9 The words of the Preacher in Ecclesiastes 1:9 are perhaps never as true as when one applies them to modern Christian storytelling, whether in fiction or the movies. The same stories are being told over and over again, … Continue reading Monday Musings (August 28, 2017): The Lost Art of Christian Storytelling