Building a Foundation (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #1)

In recent years, the Christian faith in America has seemed like little more than an enormous episode of Survivor. Far from attempting to build a society of justice, peace, welfare, and human flourishing (what the Hebrew authors called shalom), Christians have all too often seemed to hide in defensive positions, shutting themselves in metaphorical (and sometimes literal) bomb shelters as they await the end of … Continue reading Building a Foundation (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #1)

King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People: Classical Christian Education for the Head, Heart, and Hands

Abstract: In “King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People: Classical Christian Education for the Head, Heart, and Hands” Kyle Rapinchuk explores what it means to provide a “Faithful Education” in a classical Christian school. Beginning with the belief that we are loving and liturgical beings, he explores how we can provide a truly faithful education to students a classical Christian schools. He discusses five key factors involved in … Continue reading King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People: Classical Christian Education for the Head, Heart, and Hands

Trudging Joyfully Towards a Future Kingdom (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #9)

Faithful education at a classical Christian school is a topic of great significance, particularly with the growing number of students in classical Christian education. I have suggested in the previous posts in this series that faithful education in this discipline requires an emphasis on formation that nonetheless takes seriously the importance of communicating information that helps students in this formative process. Second, I proposed that … Continue reading Trudging Joyfully Towards a Future Kingdom (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #9)

Joy (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #8)

The final area for discussion is joy. Of the many valuable insights from Alexander Schmemann in his book For the Life of the World, one of the most pointed and significant discussions is on joy. Schmemann suggests that “from its very beginning Christianity has been the proclamation of joy, of the only possible joy on earth[…]Without the proclamation of this joy Christianity is incomprehensible. It … Continue reading Joy (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #8)

Imagination (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #7)

The first three areas (“Formation vs. Information,” “The Value of History,” and “The Good, the True, and the Beautiful”) discussed foundational aspects of education and the approach of the educator. We must focus on formation in addition to information, we should utilize history and the old books to build up stock responses and help correct errors of our day, and we should point students to … Continue reading Imagination (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #7)

The True, the Good, and the Beautiful (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #6)

The phrase, the good, the true, and the beautiful, has become something of a motto in classical Christian education. The phrase, rightly understood, has much to commend itself and serves as a helpful reminder for Christian educators. Not only do we aim to teach students to see the good, the true, and the beautiful in the world, but desire for them to learn to create … Continue reading The True, the Good, and the Beautiful (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #6)

The Value of History (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #5)

One of the more dangerous lies we can believe in our day is that time inevitably leads to progress. This idea that our present day is smarter, wiser, and more advanced than previous cultures simply on the basis that we have come after them has been termed “chronological snobbery.” Lewis was once accused by a friend of chronological snobbery, and he obviously learned his lesson … Continue reading The Value of History (King, Kingdom, and Kingdom People Series #5)