Teaching Poetry

By Christine Norvell   Poetry is boned with ideas, nerved and blooded with emotions, all held together by the delicate, tough skin of words.  —Paul EnglePaul  The more we read poetry, the more we appreciate what we read. Whether we read poetry for ourselves or teach it in any grade or subject, reading, appreciating, and understanding it is a skill that grows with experience. Over the … Continue reading Teaching Poetry

Pachomius

By Nathan Carr With an unobstructed view to Joy, let us go back to the first school tradition of the Christian Church—the monastery.  How did the first attempt at formal Christian education enlist its students into the great “story being told?”  Among the monastic schoolmasters of the 4th century—abbots and abbesses—one in particular gives profound insight into the formation of several abbeys throughout Egypt:  St. … Continue reading Pachomius

Teaching as a Spiritual Discipline

By Ian Mosley, Instructor of Latin, School of the Ozarks When I was a fairly new-minted Christian, I was introduced to the concept of spiritual disciplines by the writers Dallas Willard and Richard Foster. Particularly Foster’s Celebration of Discipline helped me enter imaginatively into the role that practices and habit play in spiritual formation. In a culture like ours that values spontaneity and authenticity, it … Continue reading Teaching as a Spiritual Discipline

Getting Ready:  Resources for Reflection as the School Year Approaches

For several years, when summer’s heat begins to die down and back-to-school preparations begin, I’ve sat my children down in front of the captivating documentary On the Way to School.[1]  With popcorn bowls in hand, we watch together as a family, and then my older children write a page or two of personal reflection.  While there may be some murmuring over having a writing assignment … Continue reading Getting Ready:  Resources for Reflection as the School Year Approaches

Wake the Dead with Air Guitars: Adventures in Training 3-Year Old’s in Virtue

By Nathan Carr Vigen Guroian, in his Tending the Heart of Virtue, quotes Flannery O’Connor as having said the following: “a story is a way to say something that can’t be said any other way….You tell a story because a statement would be inadequate.” You are inviting the eye-roll in your three-year old classroom if you simply said, “Olive Kate, you are resisting my role … Continue reading Wake the Dead with Air Guitars: Adventures in Training 3-Year Old’s in Virtue

Mere Mediocrity

By Nathan Carr Tim Wu, a Columbia professor who has written an editorial or two for The New York Times, is concerned that America is losing her hobbies—more alarming, leisure altogether.  To blame: “We’re afraid of being bad at them….if you’re a jogger, it is no longer enough to cruise around the block; you’re training for the next marathon.  If you’re a painter, you are no longer … Continue reading Mere Mediocrity

The Reality of Truth

By Jenna Carey, College of the Ozarks freshman and 2018 graduate of School of the Ozarks Coming from a classical education background, universal truth was ingrained in me as a foundational reality. When people ask if truth changes based on perspective, my initial reaction is to reply, “Of course reality doesn’t change. There’s only one truth and whether or not you accept it is up … Continue reading The Reality of Truth