Mere Mediocrity

By Nathan Carr Tim Wu, a Columbia professor who has written an editorial or two for The New York Times, is concerned that America is losing her hobbies—more alarming, leisure altogether.  To blame: “We’re afraid of being bad at them….if you’re a jogger, it is no longer enough to cruise around the block; you’re training for the next marathon.  If you’re a painter, you are no longer … Continue reading Mere Mediocrity

Storing Up Treasures in the Grammar Stage

I’ve been reflecting recently on the essential work of storing up language in children.  I don’t mean merely learning individual phonics sounds or word families or even isolated vocabulary words.  No, this important exposure to words is deeper than that.  In her book, Proust and the Squid, author Maryanne Wolf highlights the significance of a child’s exposure to the language of ideas at a young … Continue reading Storing Up Treasures in the Grammar Stage

The Reality of Truth

By Jenna Carey, College of the Ozarks freshman and 2018 graduate of School of the Ozarks Coming from a classical education background, universal truth was ingrained in me as a foundational reality. When people ask if truth changes based on perspective, my initial reaction is to reply, “Of course reality doesn’t change. There’s only one truth and whether or not you accept it is up … Continue reading The Reality of Truth

Stuff and Nonsense: What Mary Poppins Taught Me

“Stuff and nonsense can be fun,” says Mary Poppins in the new Mary Poppins Returns, and I couldn’t agree more. More and more as I grow older, I feel the weight of worldly responsibility. Bills to pay, meetings to schedule and attend, a family to care for, and a feeling of inadequacy for all of it. I sympathize with Michael Banks in the movie because … Continue reading Stuff and Nonsense: What Mary Poppins Taught Me

Gratitude: Feeling It Isn’t Enough

As leaders in our schools, it is no secret that not one of us is perfect. We all have our weaknesses. We all have our strengths. It is imperative that we are keenly aware which is which. This is true for a number of reasons, including our own development, how we structure our support team, what tendencies we must be aware of ourselves, and perhaps … Continue reading Gratitude: Feeling It Isn’t Enough

What I Can’t Tolerate In A Student

My boss at School of the Ozarks is a big Lonesome Dove fan, so despite my admittedly poor knowledge of westerns, I have a good many lines of this movie memorized on account of their frequent usage around school. One of my favorites is a line by Woodrow Call after a particularly violent scene leaves some beat-up bad guys and a crowd of stunned villagers. … Continue reading What I Can’t Tolerate In A Student