My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

Thank God I still read because I want to read.  I’m sure it’s the best kind of pressure—the pressure to read, that is.  But if ‘positive’ peer pressure had its way, I fear I would drown in leadership books about how to accomplish more by doing less (or some such).  My own ideas for books on leadership 14 school-years later are closer to:  Launching a … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

My Top Five Books of 2019 (Kyle Rapinchuk)

As usual, my reading plan looks very little like my actual reading list. Circumstances come along, questions get raised in class, I learn about new books being released, and I discover old treasures I had previously overlooked, and I inevitably start reading books not on my list, while relegating those on the list further down, to be read another day, and alas, another year. But … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Kyle Rapinchuk)

Walking and Talking: A Resolution

A few months ago, I reviewed a book by Philip and Carol Zaleski entitled The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings1, which details the lives of four members of the famous group.  While numerous aspects of the book make it an interesting read, I was most struck by the Zaleskis’ attention to the depth of friendship that contributed to the creative and intellectual productivity … Continue reading Walking and Talking: A Resolution

Literature and Life: Wise Words from Mole

Two large bookstores with rooms and levels sprawling upwards and outwards pulled us in like magnets to metal on a recent trip to Oxford.  I’d like to say it was just my children begging for purchases, but my husband and I were equally enchanted.  My eyes and fingertips skimmed the covers of countless classics.  After all, we were walking the streets of literary history; Narnia, … Continue reading Literature and Life: Wise Words from Mole

Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom

The following is one of the sessions from our 2019 Conference co-hosted by School of the Ozarks and held at the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO.   Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom Classical education has taught us the importance of reading quality literature from real texts. But, what other components should a successful reading program include? Mary Kay hopes … Continue reading Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom

Teaching Poetry

By Christine Norvell   Poetry is boned with ideas, nerved and blooded with emotions, all held together by the delicate, tough skin of words.  —Paul EnglePaul  The more we read poetry, the more we appreciate what we read. Whether we read poetry for ourselves or teach it in any grade or subject, reading, appreciating, and understanding it is a skill that grows with experience. Over the … Continue reading Teaching Poetry

Pachomius

By Nathan Carr With an unobstructed view to Joy, let us go back to the first school tradition of the Christian Church—the monastery.  How did the first attempt at formal Christian education enlist its students into the great “story being told?”  Among the monastic schoolmasters of the 4th century—abbots and abbesses—one in particular gives profound insight into the formation of several abbeys throughout Egypt:  St. … Continue reading Pachomius