Book Review – My Divine Comedy: A Mother’s Homeschooling Journey

Book Review By Christine Norvell Experience humbles us. So does sin. In My Divine Comedy: A Mother’s Homeschooling Journey, Missy Andrews not only presents an educator’s memoir but also a spiritual trek, one reminiscent of Petrarch’s “Ascent of Mount Ventoux.” Andrews details the failures of relying on ourselves as parents and educators. Those failures spoke to me as a mother and as a teacher because … Continue reading Book Review – My Divine Comedy: A Mother’s Homeschooling Journey

Joyful Music Literacy & the Classical Christian School Music Teacher

By Jarrod Richey There is a saying, “those who can, do, and those who can’t, teach.” The music educator might be tempted to think that he/she is missing out on the “real” work of music. But we know in the classical movement that education is more about formation than simply imparting information.[1] The honorable place of power and influence is in teaching and mentoring students. … Continue reading Joyful Music Literacy & the Classical Christian School Music Teacher

Teaching, Oblivion, and the Mortification of the Self

By Ian August Mosley, Latin Teacher at School of the Ozarks Most movies are not about teachers. They are not as popular a subject as criminals, warriors, or lovers. Nor do movies about teachers include many scenes of actual teaching. Films cover teaching itself with a demure veil that calls to mind the strict propriety of the golden age of Hollywood. In the old movies, … Continue reading Teaching, Oblivion, and the Mortification of the Self

5 Ways to Survive a Family Adventure

At this point in the coronavirus pandemic, families all over the world are reeling from a departure from the normal rhythms of our days.  Whether spring usually finds you happy at home or planning your next new expedition, we’re all on an adventure right now. C.S. Lewis famously wrote that “Adventures are never fun while you’re having them,”[1] and I have to agree with him … Continue reading 5 Ways to Survive a Family Adventure

Relational Communication: A Battle Between Time and Cultivation

By Kevin Thames You are standing in the hallway, outside your classroom door, saying goodbye to your students as the school day has come to a close. Your students are on their way to their lockers as parents are entering the school to pick up their children. You happen to see one of your students’ parents. You throw out a, “How are you doing this … Continue reading Relational Communication: A Battle Between Time and Cultivation

Are you an “Essential Worker”?

The first I heard of the potential of someone carrying around a letter from their employer stating that they are “Essential” to the operation of their organization, I thought to myself, “Well, aren’t they special?” Over the past number of weeks, due to COVID-19, companies and organizations have sought to justify their operation (and potential existence) as being “Essential” to the operation of society. From … Continue reading Are you an “Essential Worker”?

My Top Five Books of 2019 (Sara Osborne)

My favorite reads from 2019 look a bit different from 2018.  One of my personal goals this past year was to read more good stories, so it naturally follows that most of my favorites were fiction novels and biographies.  I also committed to a few longer reads this year, chipping away at the pages nightly and savoring good stories over time.  This was quite rewarding … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Sara Osborne)

My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

Thank God I still read because I want to read.  I’m sure it’s the best kind of pressure—the pressure to read, that is.  But if ‘positive’ peer pressure had its way, I fear I would drown in leadership books about how to accomplish more by doing less (or some such).  My own ideas for books on leadership 14 school-years later are closer to:  Launching a … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Nathan Carr)

My Top Five Books of 2019 (Kyle Rapinchuk)

As usual, my reading plan looks very little like my actual reading list. Circumstances come along, questions get raised in class, I learn about new books being released, and I discover old treasures I had previously overlooked, and I inevitably start reading books not on my list, while relegating those on the list further down, to be read another day, and alas, another year. But … Continue reading My Top Five Books of 2019 (Kyle Rapinchuk)

Walking and Talking: A Resolution

A few months ago, I reviewed a book by Philip and Carol Zaleski entitled The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings1, which details the lives of four members of the famous group.  While numerous aspects of the book make it an interesting read, I was most struck by the Zaleskis’ attention to the depth of friendship that contributed to the creative and intellectual productivity … Continue reading Walking and Talking: A Resolution

Literature and Life: Wise Words from Mole

Two large bookstores with rooms and levels sprawling upwards and outwards pulled us in like magnets to metal on a recent trip to Oxford.  I’d like to say it was just my children begging for purchases, but my husband and I were equally enchanted.  My eyes and fingertips skimmed the covers of countless classics.  After all, we were walking the streets of literary history; Narnia, … Continue reading Literature and Life: Wise Words from Mole

Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom

The following is one of the sessions from our 2019 Conference co-hosted by School of the Ozarks and held at the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO.   Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom Classical education has taught us the importance of reading quality literature from real texts. But, what other components should a successful reading program include? Mary Kay hopes … Continue reading Skyrocket the Reading Instruction in your Classical Classroom